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Correcting a Closed Off Congenital Dog Ear Defect

by Debra
(Texas)

I have a 2 1/2 month old pup who was not born the runt, but who is now the runt of the litter and has one ear completely closed off. Her defective ear is held almost straight out rather than pricked.


She also has a very slight under bite. I am thinking this may be because she is 2 lbs., half of what she should be. (dwarf problems?)

My question is, is it possible to open the ear? Should that even happen? What if she has a canal under there and it is closed off at the top and can't be cleaned? Is this common or ever done? She hears fine, but I suspect she doesn't have any hearing depth perception.

Editor Comment Congenital Dog Ear Problem

Puppies may be born with congenital issues, but not all of them cause severe health problems, except the deformities and/or problems directly affecting the functioning of an external or internal organ.

In this case, it might not be a big problem for the time being, but it can turn into one. It is important that the ear functions properly in terms of receiving the proper internal ear ventilation, drainage and natural care. These depend on the external dog ear canal or pinna of the ear.

Dog ear problems caused either congenitally or for any acquired reason such as from an accident, trauma, infections can be addressed by your veterinarian.

From what you describe, it appears that your dog surely has a well developed and functional inner ear canal. Along with other concerns, it should be remembered that the inner glands and ear apparatus is continuously producing nutrient rich wax and brownish matter. This matter and/wax has to be regularly removed out of the ear, otherwise, due to its stagnancy, darkness and lack of ventilation in the ear, it can provide an optimal environment for microbial growth in the ear.

Microbes such as bacteria, fungus and parasites may cause severe infections, eventually leaving a dog with a severely damaged inner ear canal and deafness. In advanced stages of a dog ear disease, lesions caused by infections may affect the inner parts of the ear cavity, leading up to the nervous system.

This problem of a closed off dog ear can be treated surgically. It seems that the major part of the cartilage of the external ear has to be removed. This means that your dog surely will get a ventilated and normal inner ear canal, but anatomically the outer ear could become unshapely. It may be possible to give the external ear a fair or acceptable shape, but that is not necessary for normal dog ear function. Shaping the ear after corrective surgery would be for cosmetic reasons only.

Dog ear surgery is more successful in younger dogs, so it's best to consult a veterinarian as soon as possible. There are also other concerns with the overall health and immune status of your puppy. It is under weight and surely has a weakened immune system, therefore it may take time to get it ready for surgery.

If a veterinarian recommends dog ear surgery, you should not delay. You can also try some supplements and dietary additions for your dog, so that it can gain weight and its immunity is enhanced. We also recommend the use of a natural remedy which will help to improve immunity and liver function. Two products to consider include ViPro Plus to enhance Immunity and Immunity and Liver Support to enhance liver function and boost immunity.

You can get other supplements and dietary modifications prescribed by a veterinarian, according to the physiological status of your dog.

Best of luck to your and your dog as you seek treatment to correct this congenital dog ear problem.

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Aug 17, 2016
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close up ear canals NEW
by: Anonymous

my 9 yr old Yorkie has developed closed ear canals due to allergies if these are removed will it happen again since he does have allergies?

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