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Dachshund Dog Urination Problem

by Renee
(FL)

Our mini dachshund is 12 years old, and has had 3 or 4 healthy litters from the age of three.

She has been very healthy, with a good weight and body and acts like a puppy still. The only sign of aging is she is white on her muzzle and has the beginning of cataracts.

The last week she has been urinating for a long time. Instead of a puddle within seconds, she squats low for a few minutes and dribbles. She doesn't act like she has an infection (seems to be in no pain and has plenty of energy.)

I want to help her, naturally, hopefully, and am hoping not to have to take her to a vet for diagnosis because of the cost. Might there be a common, easily diagnosed reason for this?

Thank you very much!

Renee' (for Sweet Nikita)



Vet Suggestion for Excessive Dog Urination


Hello Renee,

Taking Sweet Nikita (great name!) in for a veterinary exam sooner rather than later is probably the least expensive way (in the long run) to get to the bottom of her problems. It is very possible that she has a urinary tract infection (dogs don’t always act like they’re in pain with UTIs), bladder stones, or some other potentially serious condition that would benefit from a quick and accurate diagnosis and treatment.

I’m concerned that if you try home remedies that are unlikely to be successful, her condition will only worsen, making her eventual treatment more expensive and less likely to be successful.

Urinary problems do not have to be expensive to diagnose and treat. With any luck, a physical exam and urinalysis will reveal the problem and you’ll be on your way to a quick resolution to Sweet Nikita’s problem. If her condition does require a more expensive work-up and treatment protocol, many veterinarians are willing to set up a payment plan or help you apply for credit from a company that specializes in health care financing.


Regards,

Jennifer Coates, DVM

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